SEARCH RESULTS FOR: Marmalade
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(Vocal group, 1966–present) As Dean Ford and The Gaylords, this Glaswegian outfit struggled until a change of name and a subsequent hit in Holland with 1967’s psychedelic ‘I See The Rain’. Tenacity was rewarded even more the following June when they cracked the British Top 10 at last with ‘Lovin’ Things’ and began a four-year chart run. The twin ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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the same with his McGuinness-Flint unit, and Mann’s progressive Earth Band enjoyed a longer run of hits in the 1970s. Styles & Forms | Sixties | Rock Personalities | Marmalade | Sixties | Rock ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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(Instrumental group, 1917–25) The Original Dixieland Jass Band were five young white musicians from working-class uptown New Orleans – Nick LaRocca (cornet), Larry Shields (clarinet), Eddie Edwards (trombone), Tony Spargo (real name Sbarbaro, drums) and Henry Ragas (piano). All alumni of ‘Papa’ Jack Laine’s stable of bands, they went to Chicago and then to New York, where ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
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bubblegum pop No. 1. The Lemon Pipers always wanted to explore a more psychedelic direction, however, and by the time they were finally allowed to self-produce 1968’s Jungle Marmalade, they had lost all commercial appeal, and disbanded the following year. Personalities | Thunderclap Newman | One-Hit Wonders | Rock ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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Occasionally, a town or city is so integral to a style of music that the music takes its name from the place. In the early 1960s, Liverpool gave rise to the Mersey sound and Merseybeat; in the late-1980s and early 1990s, England’s Manchester spawned so–called Madchester. As much a clubbing scene and youth sub-culture as a style of ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
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Atmosphere For Success One of the reasons reggae did so well in Britain as the 1960s rolled into the 1970s was the sorry state of the singles charts. Bands like Marmalade, Herman’s Hermits and The Tremeloes still clung on but were clearly part of a bygone era, prog rock was not exactly the most disco-friendly music and glam hadn’t ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
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