SEARCH RESULTS FOR: Mendelssohn
1 of 2 Pages     Next ›

(Fa’-ne [Men’-del-son] Hen’-zel) 1805–47 German composer Fanny was the sister of Mendelssohn. They received identical musical education, but their conservative father expected Fanny to display her undoubted musical talents only within the semi-public world of the family’s renowned Sunday concerts, which she organized and performed in as pianist and conductor. Encouraged by her husband, Hensel started to publish her ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
133 Words Read More

(Fa’-leks Men’-del-son) 1809–47 German composer Mendelssohn was born into a cultured banking family, who in 1816 converted from Judaism to Christianity, adding ‘Bartholdy’ to their name. Felix studied the piano, theory and composition, and showed early talent, writing his first piece at the age of 11. There were also important non-musical inspirations for his composing at this ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
756 Words Read More

bridge that was a departure from the harpsichord type of a single, long bridge. Both Beethoven, in his latter years, and Chopin famously played on Broadwood pianos. Mendelssohn, not surprisingly given his connections with Britain, was a Broadwood customer, as was Hummel. In 1853 three major piano manufacturers were founded: Bechstein (Berlin), Blüthner (Leipzig) and ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
1062 Words Read More

The serpent is the bass member of the cornett family and, like the cornett, is made of two carved pieces of wood that are fastened together and then bound in canvas and leather. Sinuously shaped like two Ss, one leading straight into the other, it has a cup mouthpiece on the end of a brass crook, ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
156 Words Read More

violin was the major solo instrument – a position it has yet to relinquish. Outstanding examples of the concerto repertoire include Beethoven, Edward Elgar (1857–1934), Alban Berg (1885–1935), Felix Mendelssohn (1809–47), Johannes Brahms (1833–97), Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840–93) and Jean Sibelius (1865–1957). The Viola The viola is the alto member of the violin family. It had become established by 1535 ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
3545 Words Read More

, but his K361/ 370a requires 12 winds plus a double bass. However, there were no fixed rules; when, at the end of the classical age, Felix Mendelssohn (1809–47) wrote an overture for Harmonie, op. 24 (1824), it was for no fewer than 23 winds plus percussion. Because of their carrying power, wind ensembles are able ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
221 Words Read More

the works of Mozart, Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750), Joseph Haydn (1732–1809), Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827), Franz Schubert (1797–1828), Robert Schumann (1810–56), Frédéric François Chopin (1810–49), Franz Liszt (1811–86), Felix Mendelssohn (1809–47), Johannes Brahms (1833–97), Claude Debussy (1862–1918), Maurice Ravel (1875–1937), George Gershwin (1898–1937) and many more. Its foremost practitioners, from Liszt to Ignacy Paderewski (1860–1941) and beyond, were ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
920 Words Read More

deepest level. Origins of the Ring Wagner first became interested in the subject of the Ring in the mid-1840s, at a time when several other composers, including Felix Mendelssohn (1809–47), Robert Schumann (1810–56), Liszt and Niels Gade (1817–1890), were similarly drawn to the theme. All of them were responding to the operatic potential of the early thirteenth-century Nibelungenlied (‘Lay ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
1154 Words Read More

the opera stage entirely and became a popular feature at wedding ceremonies. It was, however, largely dropped from Jewish wedding ceremonies in favour of the march by Felix Mendelssohn (1809–47) after the Nazi Party in Germany, which shared Wagner’s racist and anti-semitic views, made a national hero of him in the 1930s. Composed 1846–48 Premiered 1850, ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
858 Words Read More

1842–1900 English composer Sullivan was a Chapel Royal chorister, the first-ever Mendelssohn scholar and a student of William Sterndale Bennett. He was already a composer of distinction when, in 1867, he collaborated with the playwright W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) in Cox and Box (1866). Their Trial by Jury (1875) set the seal on a historic partnership that spawned ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
280 Words Read More

A boy chorister at King’s College, Cambridge, he began studies aged 10 at the Royal Academy of Music (RAM), where his teachers included Cipriani Potter. Close friends included Mendelssohn and Robert Schumann, who wrote enthusiastically about him in the Neue Zeitschrift für Musik (‘New Musical Journal’). Their influence can be found in his music, which includes four ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
160 Words Read More

1781–1861 American composer Heinrich was one of the most important figures in American musical life in the nineteenth century. Born in Bohemia to a German family, he tried unsuccessfully to set up business in America, and in 1817 he settled there to embark on a musical career, becoming the country’s first professional composer, and being dubbed by ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
142 Words Read More

1921–86 Belgian violinist Grumiaux made his debut in Brussels with the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto, but his career was immediately interrupted by the war. He made his British debut in 1945. Noted for his fastidious playing, he made many recordings, including the unaccompanied Bach sonatas and the sonatas of Mozart and Beethoven. Introduction | Modern Era | Classical Personalities ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
66 Words Read More

same year he married his cousin Nina Hagerup, a soprano who gave the premieres of many of his songs. Grieg’s style combines the early German Romanticism of Schumann and Mendelssohn with nationalistic Norwegian elements, but these are filtered through his distinctive lyrical imagination. His best-known works are his Piano Concerto (1868), still a concert favourite (which Liszt sight-read perfectly ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
311 Words Read More

François-Joseph Gossec (1734–1829) and Berlioz. Recommended Recording: Joseph, soloists, NWDR Choir & Orchestra, Hamburg (cond) Wilhelm Schüchter (Gala) Introduction | Early Romantic | Classical Personalities | Felix Mendelssohn | Early Romantic | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
140 Words Read More
1 of 2 Pages     Next ›

AUTHORITATIVE

An extensive music information resource, bringing together the talents and expertise of a wide range of editors and musicologists, including Stanley Sadie, Charles Wilson, Paul Du Noyer, Tony Byworth, Bob Allen, Howard Mandel, Cliff Douse, William Schafer, John Wilson...

CURATED

Classical, Rock, Blues, Jazz, Country and more. Flame Tree has been making encyclopaedias and guides about music for over 20 years. Now Flame Tree Pro brings together a huge canon of carefully curated information on genres, styles, artists and instruments. It's a perfect tool for study, and entertaining too, a great companion to our music books.

Rock, A Life Story

Rock, A Life Story

The ultimate story of a life of rock music, from the 1950s to the present day.

David Bowie

David Bowie

Fantastic new, unofficial biography covers his life, music, art and movies, with a sweep of incredible photographs.