SEARCH RESULTS FOR: Shostakovich
1 of 2 Pages     Next ›

Katerina part with hers and gives them to Sonetka. As the convicts line up, Katerina pushes Sonetka into the river. Both of them are swept away. Personalities | Dmitri Shostakovich | Modern Era | Opera ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
300 Words Read More

(D’me’-tre Shus-ta-ko’vich) 1906–75 Russian composer Shostakovich was the first of his country’s composers to come to attention after the Russian Revolution of 1917, and since Stravinsky, Rachmaninov and (until the 1930s) Prokofiev were all living abroad, his early successes made him the great hope of Soviet music. He became associated with the Western-influenced modernist movement in the Soviet ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
794 Words Read More

1906–75, Russian Born in tsarist Russia, Shostakovich spent his entire career under the critical and often hectoring gaze of the Soviet regime, yet he still managed to produce some of his nation’s most powerful and engaging twentieth-century music. Studying composition at the Petrograd Conservatory from 1919 to 1925, he presented Symphony No. 1 as his graduation piece ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
235 Words Read More

scored for bass clarinet in A and used the low E, which requires the modern instrument to have extra length and an extra key. Similar depths are required by Shostakovich, who wrote for instruments with this extra range. Styles & Forms | Late Romantic | Classical Instruments | Oboe | Late Romantic | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
174 Words Read More

was used as a solo instrument in the twentieth-century orchestra – as in Bartók’s Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta (1936) and in the music of Stockhausen, Dmitri Shostakovich (1906–75), Sergei Prokofiev (1891–1953) and Pierre Boulez (b. 1925). Marimba The marimba appears to have been largely unknown in Europe until the manufacture of orchestral instruments from 1910, but ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
1151 Words Read More

but it may have originated from rural North America in the late-nineteenth century. It was a popular musical-hall and vaudeville instrument around the turn of the twentieth century, and Shostakovich included it in his opera The Nose (1927–28). Flexatone The musical saw is similar to the flexatone, which was invented as a jazz instrument in the 1920s. The flexatone ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
738 Words Read More

The snare drum is cylindrical. It has a wooden or metal frame with parchment stretched across either end. Stretched across the lower of these is a metal ‘snare’ which rattles when the drum is beaten. Another name for snare drums is ‘side drums’ because they were carried at the hip by army drummers. Snare drums are often used in Handel’s Music for ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
214 Words Read More

Acoustic Guitar Throughout its history, the guitar has – perhaps more than any other instrument – managed to bridge the gap between the often disconnected worlds of classical, folk and popular music. Its roots go back to Babylonian times; by the 1500s it was prevalent in Spain, and is still sometimes called the Spanish guitar. Medieval versions – ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
3244 Words Read More

The great works for viola, though, came in the twentieth century. Composers including Bartók, Walton, Paul Hindemith (1895–1963), Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872–1958), Benjamin Britten (1913–76), Dmitri Shostakovich (1906–75) and Luciano Berio (1925–2003) all wrote excellent solo works. Not only that, but the viola took up a more prominent position in the orchestra. It is today regarded ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
3545 Words Read More

the 1930s, and came second to Ginette Neveu (1919–49) in the 1935 Wieniawski competition. His international career developed after the war. Many composers wrote works for him, notably Shostakovich, whose First Concerto he played at his New York debut in 1955. Introduction | Contemporary | Classical Personalities | Emmanuel Pahud | Contemporary | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
75 Words Read More

, Schwarzkopf was sometimes prone to vocal and textual mannerisms. She was the first Anne Trulove in Stravinsky’s The Rake’s Progress. Introduction | Modern Era | Opera Personalities | Dmitri Shostakovich | Modern Era | Opera ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
119 Words Read More

b. 1943 Latvian conductor Jansons studied at the Leningrad Conservatory and in Austria with Karajan before becoming associate (later associate principal) conductor of the Leningrad Philharmonic 1973–97 and music director of the Oslo Philharmonic 1979–2000 (an orchestra whose international reputation he consolidated through tours and recordings) and the Pittsburgh Symphony 1997–2004, succeeding Maazel. He was then chief conductor of both ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
97 Words Read More

b. 1974 Russian violinist Vengerov gave his first recital when he was five, and played his first concerto at the age of six. Since winning the Carl Flesch competition in 1990 he has given recitals and played concertos in Europe, America and the Far East. He gave the first performance of Rodin Shchedrin’s Concerto cantabile in 1998. His many ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
80 Words Read More

studied at the Moscow Conservatory, where he was appointed professor in 1956, the year of his London and New York debuts. Composers who wrote works for him include Shostakovich and Britten. He left the USSR in 1974. As well as accompanying his wife, the soprano Galina Vishnevskaya, on the piano, he frequently appeared as a conductor. ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
74 Words Read More

the opera in Leipzig, resigning the latter in 2008. As well as Italian operatic repertory, Chailly’s discography includes the symphonies of Bruckner and Mahler, as well as Shostakovich, Stravinsky and Berio. Introduction | Contemporary | Classical Personalities | William Christie | Contemporary | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
95 Words Read More
1 of 2 Pages     Next ›

AUTHORITATIVE

An extensive music information resource, bringing together the talents and expertise of a wide range of editors and musicologists, including Stanley Sadie, Charles Wilson, Paul Du Noyer, Tony Byworth, Bob Allen, Howard Mandel, Cliff Douse, William Schafer, John Wilson...

CURATED

Classical, Rock, Blues, Jazz, Country and more. Flame Tree has been making encyclopaedias and guides about music for over 20 years. Now Flame Tree Pro brings together a huge canon of carefully curated information on genres, styles, artists and instruments. It's a perfect tool for study, and entertaining too, a great companion to our music books.

Rock, A Life Story

Rock, A Life Story

The ultimate story of a life of rock music, from the 1950s to the present day.

David Bowie

David Bowie

Fantastic new, unofficial biography covers his life, music, art and movies, with a sweep of incredible photographs.