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to be melted down. The casting is successful. The Pope is pleased and Balducci allows Teresa to marry Cellini. Everyone rejoices in the triumph of the arts. Personalities | Louis-Hector Berlioz | Early Romantic | Opera ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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Live LSO0010; Soloists: Petra Lang (Cassandre), Michelle DeYoung (Didon), Sara Mingardo (Anna), Ben Heppner (Enée), Kenneth Tarver (Iopas), Toby Spence (Hylas), Peter Mattei (Chorèbe), Stephen Milling (Narbal) Personalities | Louis-Hector Berlioz | Early Romantic | Opera Performance | First Performance of Les Troyens | Early Romantic | Opera ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Loo-e’ Ek-tôr’ Ber-lyoz’) 1803–69 French composer and critic Berlioz was the leading French musician of his age. His greatest achievements, and those for which he is best remembered, were with large-scale orchestral and vocal works, although he also wrote in other genres. He was rooted in classical traditions – his earliest influences included Gluck and the music of the ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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1803–69, French The French composer Louis-Hector Berlioz, who once wrote that the opera houses of his time were too large, did a splendid job of filling their auditoria with the mighty sound of epic opera. His opera output was small, consisting of only five completed works, but their impact transcended mere numbers. Berlioz’s first surviving opera ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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Adolphe Sax (1814–94), who had also invented the saxhorn. It soon made its way into wind bands and was occasionally used in the orchestra, first of all by Louis-Hector Berlioz (1803–69) and the operatic composer, Giacomo Meyerbeer (1791–1864). Woodwind instruments were further developed and refined. The clarinet was improved and championed by composers such as Carl Maria von Weber ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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The German player and maker Iwan Müller had developed a 13-keyed instrument in about 1812 and the music being written for the clarinet at the beginning of the nineteenth century by Weber, among others, made an instrument with 13 keys essential. While its chamber-music life in the classical period had produced such masterpieces as the Beethoven Septet (op. 20) ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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The cornet’s sound is mellow and easy, but it lacks brilliance and bite. Consequently a pair of cornets was often used in conjunction with a pair of trumpets. Louis-Hector Berlioz (1803–69), César Franck (1822–90) and Georges Bizet (1838–1875) were early champions of the cornet, and it was also used successfully by Edward Elgar (1857–1934) and Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971). The ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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The cornet is a looped brass instrument with a wide bore and three valves. Beginning life as a development of the circular looped post horn, it became a valved instrument in France in the late 1820s. It apparently reached Britain in the 1830s, where its bright sound soon displaced the keyed bugle from amateur wind bands. Most often to ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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drum with one hand and the cymbal with the other. Christoph Willibald von Gluck (1714–87) composed one of the first independent cymbal parts in his opera Iphigénie en Tauride (1779). Berlioz was the first composer to specify a cymbal struck with beaters. A suspended cymbal can also be scraped lightly with a metal beater or coin, as in Claude Debussy’s ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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best-known of all classical ensembles, the symphony orchestra developed from the expansion of the chamber orchestra in the 1820s and 1830s, when composers such as Beethoven and Louis-Hector Berlioz (1803–69), and later Franz Liszt (1811–86) and Richard Wagner (1813–83), added more instruments to increase the volume of sound and the number of available tone colours. The main difference from ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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The euphonium (the name is coined from Greek and means ‘sweet-voiced’) is a brass instrument with a compass of three octaves. Developed from the bass saxhorn, it has a wide conical profile and an upward-facing bell. Although prototypes were known in Germany in the 1820s and an instrument was patented in 1838 by Carl Moritz of Berlin, the first ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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, and Variations and composed many other pieces specifically for the instrument. The original scoring of Rossini’s Petite Messe solenelle was for two pianos and harmonium. The only keyboard music Louis-Hector Berlioz (1803–69) ever wrote are three pieces for harmonium (1845), and nothing in the chamber-music repertoire exceeds the charm and warmth of Dvořák’s delectable Bagatelles (Op. 47) for two violins, ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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and its versatility minimal, but with the outlay of relatively little cost – and skill – a small church could acquire an organ sound; eventually heavy-weight composers such as Berlioz and Richard Strauss came to admire its qualities. Two foot pedals were pressed up and down in turn, blowing air across the pipes; the air was transferred to a ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
2133 Words Read More

made significant developments to the cor anglais, adding new keys, and partially straightening the body. He was helped by virtuoso player Gustave Vogt. Vogt was greatly admired by Berlioz, and together they did much to cement the instrument’s reputation. By incorporating it into their works. It was another performer, Henri Brod, who took the cor anglais ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
1984 Words Read More

Edinburgh called his ‘serpentkleides’), it had anything from nine to 12 keys. The ophicleide was taken up by military bands, but can also be found in the scores of Berlioz, Verdi and Wagner. Styles & Forms | Late Romantic | Classical Instruments | Guitar | Modern Era | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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