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(Man’-wel da Fa’-ya) 1876–1946 Spanish composer Falla first trained as a pianist and had written five zarzuelas (Spanish light operas) before studying composition with Felipe Pedrell (1841–1922), who influenced him profoundly with his insistence that Spanish composers should write ‘Spanish music with a view of Europe’. Falla then moved to Paris, where Ravel and Debussy influenced the exquisite orchestral colour ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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to raise the guitar’s status to that of respected concert-hall instrument. His influence was naturally focused on Spain and South America, encouraging composers including Joaquín Rodrigo (1901–99), Manuel de Falla (1876–1946), Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (1895–1968) and Heitor Villa-Lobos (1887–1959) to write for the guitar. By the time of his death in 1987, there existed a strong body of music that ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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of the world. After almost a century of neglect, the harpsichord was taken up by composers as well as performers – most notably, Ferruccio Busoni (1866–1924), Manuel de Falla (1976–1946), Henry Cowell (1897–1965), Frederick Delius (1862–1934), Jean Françaix (b. 1912), Bohuslav Martino (1890–1959), Darius Milhaud (1892–1974), Carl Orff (1895–1982), Francis Poulenc (1899–1963), Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971), and later, Luciano ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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Many musical cultures have made use of wooden concussion sticks. Their history goes back to ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and they are played by the Aboriginal people of Australia. This group of instruments includes pairs of sticks struck together like claves (3 cm/1 in wide, 20 cm/8 in long), which are cylindrical wooden dowels widely used in Latin-American, ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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age of 15. Considering it his mission to have the guitar taken seriously, he transcribed music written for the lute and the vihuela. Contemporaries who wrote for him included Falla, Joaquín Rodrigo (1901–99) and Villa-Lobos; he played with much passion and intensity. Introduction | Modern Era | Classical Personalities | Rudolf Serkin | Modern Era | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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composer Born in Lérida, Granados studied with Pedrell in Barcelona and then in Paris. He later founded and directed a music academy in Barcelona. Like his compatriots Albéniz and Falla, he forged a new Spanish style, with strumming effects, ornamentation, modes and exuberant dance rhythms. His best-known works are the Goyescas (1911), two sets of imaginative ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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strength drawn from Eastern European folk music. Recommended Recording: Oedipe, soloists, Monte Carlo PO (cond) Lawrence Foster (EMI/Warner) Introduction | Modern Era | Classical Personalities | Manuel de Falla | Modern Era | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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with Felipe Pedrell (1841–1922), famous for his pioneering collections of Spanish folk and classical music that also inspired Albéniz’s contemporary Enrique Granados and, a little later, Manuel de Falla (1876–1946). Aged 20, he abandoned his virtuoso career in favour of composition, producing, during nearly 30 years, over 250 piano works of Spanish character. Among the ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Hwa-keen’ Too-re’-na) 1882–1949 Spanish composer A friend of Falla, Turina was, like him, a composer of nationalist music, but his style was also affected by his eight years of study in Paris. His orchestral music is full of Spanish local colour, and is often richly, sometimes heavily scored. His best-known orchestral works are La procesion ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Ro-bâr’-to Gâr’-härd) 1896–1970 Catalan composer Like Falla, Gerhard was a pupil of the great apostle of Spanish national music, Pedrell, but Gerhard also studied with Schoenberg. Much of his music reflects this duality, which was sharpened by his exile from Spain after the Civil War (1936–39), when he lived in England. His opera The Duenna (1947), his ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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his contemporaries on the harpsichord. She founded a school of early music near Paris. She was influential through her writings and recordings, which show her vigour and rhythmic strength. Falla and Poulenc wrote concertos for her. Introduction | Modern Era | Classical Personalities | Dinu Lipatti | Modern Era | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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countries wishing to establish a place in the Western canon. Spain and Latin America in particular made a bid, with Isaac Albéniz (1860–1909), Enrique Granados (1867–1916) and Manuel de Falla (1876–1946) quickly establishing a Spanish style and the presence of Spanish composers with a distinct voice. In Latin America, Silvestre Revueltas (1891–1940), Heitor Villa-Lobos (1887–1959) and Alberto Ginastera (1916–83) ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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In the late Baroque era, opera was the most widely cultivated musical form. It had its own social and economic subculture and engaged many of the finest composers. By the early eighteenth century, most of the principal cities in Europe had imported opera from Italy and modified it to suit the local audiences’ taste. In France, opera remained ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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