SEARCH RESULTS FOR: Ludwig van Beethoven
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Premiered at Vienna’s Kärntnertor Theater on 23 May 1814, the final version of Fidelio is a fundamentally different opera from the 1805 original. There is now much less emphasis on the gaoler’s daughter Marzelline and her world of Singspiel domesticity. Although the fate of Florestan and Leonore remains central, the individual characterization becomes more idealized and stereotyped. The human ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Lood’-wig van Bat’-ho-fan) 1770–1827 German composer Ludwig van Beethoven is one of the greatest composers in history – perhaps the greatest. Standing at the crossroads between the classical and Romantic eras, he created music that belongs not just to its period but to all time. He excelled in virtually every genre of his day, and had enormous influence on the ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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1770–1827, German Ludwig van Beethoven was born in Bonn to a musical family, on 16 December 1770. He started composing at the age of 11 and experienced opera from the inside when he joined the Bonn court orchestra as a viola player in 1789. His letters reveal that from his early years in Vienna, where he moved in ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Jo-van’-e An’-ne-moo-chya) c. 1500–71 Italian composer Animuccia, who lived and worked in Rome in the 1550s and 1560s, was one of the earliest composers of music for the Catholic Counter-Reformation. For Filippo Neri and his Oratorians he composed two books of laudi spirituali, simple devotional songs with Latin or Italian texts. His first book of Masses (1567) was, ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Jo-van’-ne Gab-re-a’-le) c. 1553–1612 Italian composer Gabrieli was taught by his uncle Andrea Gabrieli and, like him, was first employed in Munich with Lassus. After Andrea’s death Giovanni became principal composer for St Mark’s, Venice, and he wrote much of his music with its choir (and building) in mind. His musical debt to his uncle is evident in ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Jo-van’-ne Gas-tol’-de) c. 1550s–1622 Italian composer Gastoldi spent much of his career in Mantua, where in the early 1590s he composed music for a production of Battista Guarini’s famous play, Il pastor fido (‘The Faithful Shepherd’); although the production was scrapped, Gastoldi published some of his music in 1602. He is best known, however, for his ballettos ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Jo-van’-e Per-loo-e’-je da Pa-les-tre’-na) 1525/6–94 Italian composer Palestrina is named after a small town near Rome, where he is thought to have been born. He was educated in Rome; in 1537 he was a choirboy at the basilica of S Maria Maggiore, one of the city’s principal churches and an important musical establishment. By 1544 he was back in Palestrina ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Lood’-vikh Zen’-fal) c. 1486–1542/3 Swiss composer Senfl joined the choir of Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I as a choirboy in 1498 and became Isaac’s star pupil. On Isaac’s death in 1517, Senfl succeeded him in the position of Hofkomponist. From 1523 until his death he was in Munich, at the court chapel of Duke Wilhelm IV of Bavaria. Although he ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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Eddie Van Halen redefined the sound of heavy metal at the end of the 1970s. His high-velocity solos, distinguished by his finger-tapping technique and tremolo-bar effects, on Van Halen’s 1978 debut album heralded a new era in hard-rock guitar that rejected the clichés of a jaded genre. His solo on Michael Jackson’s ‘Beat It’ in 1982, which effectively ...

Source: Rock Guitar Heroes, consultant editor Rusty Cutchin
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Many were those in 1972 who would have snorted at the idea that an artist so obsessed with superficiality and chart success would sustain a multi-decade career characterized by career-jeopardising innovation. Hours… (1999) saw Bowie co-writing with Tin Machine guitarist and subsequent frequent collaborator Reeves Gabrels. The album had originated in a commission to score a computer game called Omikron: The ...

Source: David Bowie: Ever Changing Hero, by Sean Egan
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(Jo-van’-e Bo-non-che’ne) 1670–1747 Italian composer Bononcini came from a musical family in Modena; his father Giovanni Maria was the maestro di cappella of Modena Cathedral and his younger brother, Antonio Maria, was a talented cellist and composer. The younger Giovanni was also a cellist and studied music in Bologna. He worked in Milan, then Rome – where he wrote ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Jo-van’-ne Bat-tes’-ta Pâr-go-la’-ze) 1710–36 Italian composer Pergolesi studied in Naples with Francesco Durante (1684–1755). He received his first commission in 1731 and the following year was appointed maestro di cappella to the equerry of the Viceroy of Naples. Pergolesi composed comic and serious opera, sacred music and a small quantity of instrumental music. He is chiefly remembered for two works of ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Yo’-han Lood’-vikh Kreps) 1713–80 German composer Like his father, Johann Tobias (1690–1762), Krebs was a pupil of J. S. Bach; he attended St Thomas’s School in Leipzig for nine years and won a warm testimonial from the great man. He was organist at Zwickau from 1737, then from 1744 at Zeitz and finally at Gotha (he applied unsuccessfully for the ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Jo-van’-ne Bat-tes’-ta Mär-te’-ne) 1706–84 Italian theorist and composer Padre Martini, as he was always known, was the most influential theorist and musical thinker of his time. He was born in Bologna, traditionally a centre of learning, where he studied with his father and leading musicians before entering a monastery. He returned to Bologna as organist and then as ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Jo-van’-ne Pi-se-el’-lo) 1740–1816 Italian composer Paisiello was trained in Naples and had early successes as an opera composer there and in north Italy. He served as court composer to Catherine the Great in St Petersburg, 1776–84; there, in 1782, he wrote Il barbiere di Siviglia, his most admired comic opera. He returned to Italy and spent most of ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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