SEARCH RESULTS FOR: Poulenc
1 of 2 Pages     Next ›

(Blanche de la Force), Véronique Gens (Madame Lidoine), Sandrine Piau (Soeur Constance de Saint Denis), Rosalind Plowright (Madame de Croissy), Topi Lehtipuu (Le Chevalier de la Force) Personalities | Francis Poulenc | Modern Era | Opera ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
464 Words Read More

(Fran-ses Poo-lank’) 1899–1963 French composer Poulenc was the youngest member of the group of composers known as ‘Les Six’; his urbanity and humour and his many masterly songs have given him a reputation as a light-hearted miniaturist. His range, however, is better indicated by his three operas: Les mamelles de Tirésias (‘Tiresias’ Breasts’, 1947), a joyously Gallic and absurd ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
148 Words Read More

1899–1963, French Born into social privilege, Poulenc was introduced to the Parisian art scene by his piano teacher and mentor, Ricardo Viñes, and struck out in a new direction when becoming part of a non-conformist group known as Les Six. Hardly members of the avant-garde, these young composers instead liked to combine popular music styles with ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
305 Words Read More

a strong body of music that continues to grow. The guitar repertoire has been enlarged by works from some of the composing heavyweights of the twentieth century, including Francis Poulenc (1899–1963), Benjamin Britten (1913–76), Michael Tippett (1905–98), Hans Werner Henze (b. 1926), William Walton (1902–83) and Rodney Bennett (b. 1936). Segovia’s zeal for encouraging new work has been taken up ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
1082 Words Read More

most notably, Ferruccio Busoni (1866–1924), Manuel de Falla (1976–1946), Henry Cowell (1897–1965), Frederick Delius (1862–1934), Jean Françaix (b. 1912), Bohuslav Martino (1890–1959), Darius Milhaud (1892–1974), Carl Orff (1895–1982), Francis Poulenc (1899–1963), Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971), and later, Luciano Berio (1925–2003), Iannis Xenakis (1922–2001), Elliott Carter (b. 1908) and György Ligeti (b. 1923). Introduction | Keyboards Instruments | Clavichord | Keyboards ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
1189 Words Read More

in its own right, including the Concerto Fantasy for Two Timpani and Orchestra (2000) by Philip Glass (b. 1937) and concertos for organ, timpani and strings by Francis Poulenc (1899–1963) and Jean Langlais (1907–91). The Modern Timpani Typically, a modern symphony orchestra will have five timpani, covering a range of D to b. The timpanist uses a ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
1093 Words Read More

Zimmermann travelled outside Germany just once, when he was sent to France during the war. Here, he familiarized himself with the musical scores of Stravinsky, Honegger, Poulenc and Milhaud. On his return in 1942 he decided to study traditional composition with Jarnach, a former pupil of Busoni, but by 1950 he was using Schoenberg’s 12-tone ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
205 Words Read More

Recommended Recording: Murder in the Cathedral, soloists, Vienna State Opera Chorus and Orchestra (cond) Herbert von Karajan (Deutsche Grammophon) Introduction | Modern Era | Classical Personalities | Francis Poulenc | Modern Era | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
116 Words Read More

failed Hollywood screen test for the role of Carmen, made her final concert appearances in 1939. She was just 42. Introduction | Modern Era | Opera Personalities | Francis Poulenc | Modern Era | Opera Houses & Companies | The Birth of the Metropolitan Opera | Turn of the Century | Opera ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
149 Words Read More

on the harpsichord. She founded a school of early music near Paris. She was influential through her writings and recordings, which show her vigour and rhythmic strength. Falla and Poulenc wrote concertos for her. Introduction | Modern Era | Classical Personalities | Dinu Lipatti | Modern Era | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
74 Words Read More

liking. From the 1920s onwards, Cocteau became occasionally involved with a loosely knit group of composers known as ‘Les Six’. Though generalizing about these six very different composers (Francis Poulenc, Darius Milhaud, Arthur Honegger, Germaine Tailleferre, Louis Durey and Georges Auric) is difficult, most of them experimented in the 1920s with popular musical styles either ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
2577 Words Read More

suggest the psychological inner world of thoughts and feelings, Surrealism and Dada impacting opera via Guillaume Apollinaire’s Les mamelles de Tirésias (‘The Breasts of Tirésias’, 1947), composed by Francis Poulenc (1899–1963). A Varied Repertoire From grand venues to the intimate chamber settings of church halls, salons and small public theatres, operas varied radically, and so did the ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
1321 Words Read More

influence on the younger generation, notably a group of French composers dubbed ‘Les Six’ by the critic Paul Collaer in analogy to the Russian Five. The six composers, Poulenc, Milhaud, Honegger, Auric, Tailleferre and Durey, enjoyed but a brief collective identity, giving just a handful of concerts together and collaborating as an entire ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
4189 Words Read More

successful operas written since the death of Giacomo Puccini (1858–1924), thanks in part to its quasi-Mozartean music and dramaturgy, well served by a sardonic libretto. The Pre-war Tradition Francis Poulenc (1899–1963) wrote his first opera, Les Mamelles de Tirésias (‘Tiresias’s Breasts’) in 1944, but it was not staged until 1947. The riotous musical business, fondly evoking broad ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
4727 Words Read More

painters, dancers and composers, including Maurice Ravel (1875–1937), Stravinsky and Debussy. Undaunted though not unaffected by the financial crises following World War I, Diaghilev pointed Stravinsky and Poulenc in the direction of neo-classicism, the former with his ballet Pulcinella (1919–20), the latter with his witty social satire Les biches (‘The Darlings’, 1923). Introduction | Modern Era | ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
247 Words Read More
1 of 2 Pages     Next ›

AUTHORITATIVE

An extensive music information resource, bringing together the talents and expertise of a wide range of editors and musicologists, including Stanley Sadie, Charles Wilson, Paul Du Noyer, Tony Byworth, Bob Allen, Howard Mandel, Cliff Douse, William Schafer, John Wilson...

CURATED

Classical, Rock, Blues, Jazz, Country and more. Flame Tree has been making encyclopaedias and guides about music for over 20 years. Now Flame Tree Pro brings together a huge canon of carefully curated information on genres, styles, artists and instruments. It's a perfect tool for study, and entertaining too, a great companion to our music books.

Rock, A Life Story

Rock, A Life Story

The ultimate story of a life of rock music, from the 1950s to the present day.

David Bowie

David Bowie

Fantastic new, unofficial biography covers his life, music, art and movies, with a sweep of incredible photographs.