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(Zhan Se-bal-yoos) 1865–1957 Finnish composer When Jean (Johan) Sibelius, Finland’s greatest composer, was born on 8 December 1865 at Hämeenlinna, his homeland had been ruled by Russia since Napoleon snatched it from Sweden. As a child he composed and played the violin, but he was 14 before taking up the instrument seriously. He enrolled in 1886 at the ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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This algorithmic-composition package also plays a role in his 2005 release, Another Day On Earth. Notation Musicians, composers and publishers use sophisticated music notation software – such as Sibelius or Finale – to produce musical scores. Effectively, musical desktop-publishing systems enable the user to input music on to staff notation using a combination of MIDI keyboard, qwerty ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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The English horn, or cor anglais, is a member of the oboe family. It is neither English nor a horn, and the name is usually written off as a mystery. Pitched a fifth below the oboe, it had been developed in 1760 by Ferlandis of Bergamo, but was rarely heard in the orchestra before the Romantic ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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yet to relinquish. Outstanding examples of the concerto repertoire include Beethoven, Edward Elgar (1857–1934), Alban Berg (1885–1935), Felix Mendelssohn (1809–47), Johannes Brahms (1833–97), Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840–93) and Jean Sibelius (1865–1957). The Viola The viola is the alto member of the violin family. It had become established by 1535 and at that time it was more commonly known as the ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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1902–83 English composer After singing in the choir at Christ Church, Oxford, Walton became an undergraduate there, his talent attracting the attention of the Sitwell family (the poets Edith and Osbert and their writer brother Sacheverell). They supported him for 10 years, enabling him to write music at leisure until he earned enough to become independent. At ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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in serialism was swiftly replaced with a strong feeling for simple, expressive themes, diatonicism and clarity of structure (Elegy for Sebastian Knight, 1964). Like his compatriot Jean Sibelius (1865–1957), Sallinen developed a strong interest in the folk traditions of his country, evident in his use of both folk melodies and texts from the Finnish national epic, ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
128 Words Read More

Animals, Septet, Michel Béroff, Jean-Philippe Collard, Maurice André, Michel Debost, French String Trio et al (EMI/Erato) Introduction | Late Romantic | Classical Personalities | Jean Sibelius | Late Romantic | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(A’-no-yo-hä’-ne Rau’-te-vä’-rer) b. 1928 Finnish composer Rautavaara studied at the Sibelius Academy, Helsinki, and then at the Juilliard School, New York, with Copland, Sessions and others. His early works show the influences of neo-classicism and serialism. His atmospheric Cantus arcticus (1972) for orchestra with taped birdsong marked the onset of a mystical phase, characterized by ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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Enescu. She won the International Wieniawski Competition in 1935. She toured Europe, the US and Canada, making her London debut in 1945. Her recordings of the Brahms and Sibelius concertos show the force and passion of her playing. She died in a plane crash. Introduction | Modern Era | Classical Personalities | Gregor Piatigorsky | Modern Era | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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1896–1981 American composer Hanson’s symphonies suggest an American Sibelius; his choral music is grandly optimistic (Song of Democracy, 1957; Songs of Human Rights, 1963) and his opera, Merry Mount, was well received at its premiere in 1933. He was Director of the Eastman School of Music for many years, where he made a notable reputation as ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Kär-ya Särre-a-ho) b. 1952 Finnish composer Saariaho studied at the Sibelius Academy and the Freiburg Conservatory before moving to Paris, where she worked at IRCAM, the centre for electroacoustic music established by Boulez. A lot of her early works explored the potential of live electronics and computer-assisted composition. Key to the latter was the analysis of instrumental sound spectra ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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b. 1958 Finnish composer He studied at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki, and later with Ferneyhough and Lachenmann. He made several visits to IRCAM, the research institute founded by Boulez in Paris, and while electronics no longer feature extensively in his music, his distinctive harmonic language owes much to the experiments in spectral analysis he undertook there. ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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Danish composer The most significant Danish symphonist since Nielsen, Nørgård studied at the Royal Danish Conservatory in Copenhagen and privately in Paris with Nadia Boulanger, also corresponding with Sibelius, whose organically evolving textures strongly influenced his later output. In the 1970s he began experimenting with the natural harmonics of the overtone series, sometimes combined in quarter-tone tunings ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Vil’-elm Sten’-ham-här) 1871–1927 Swedish composer Like his friends Sibelius and Nielsen, the Swedish composer Stenhammar sought a national language independent of nineteenth-century Romanticism. He wrote two symphonies, two concertos for his own instrument, two operas, choral music, six fine string quartets and numerous songs, in a style that is distinctively Nordic but owes something to ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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war, the common European culture of which the Viennese musical tradition had been a pillar. If Mahler’s approach to the symphony was compendious, his Finnish contemporary, Jean Sibelius (1865–1957), tended towards terse concentration and a classical balance. He achieved this by means of a smaller orchestra, a simpler harmonic language, and the clear formal models against ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
1034 Words Read More
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