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The cornett of European Renaissance art music is a longer finger-hole horn made of wood. A precursor to the modern brass horns, it should not be confused with the valved – and much later developed – cornet. Construction and Playing Technique The cornett is a long tube, usually around 60 cm (20 in) in length. It is normally curved ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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Not to be confused with the modern valved brass-band cornet, which is a kind of small trumpet, the cornett (with that extra final ‘t’) was made of two carved, lightly curved pieces of European hardwood (such as pear) bound together and wrapped in leather. The instrument is further unusual in that it has an octagonal finish. To the ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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of both Telemann and J. S. Bach; Vivaldi distinguished himself by composing no fewer than 37 concertos for the instrument. Styles & Forms | Early Baroque | Classical Instruments | Cornett | Early Baroque | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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instruments, would participate. Solo operatic singing was now becoming very agile and flamboyant, and melodic instruments that could imitate this sort of soloistic writing were therefore favoured. The cornett, a kind of wooden trumpet, was capable of this, as was the violin, which was rapidly replacing the viol as the preferred string instrument, because ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
5434 Words Read More

At its simplest, to make a double reed the end of a piece of reed or similar plant tube is flattened so its sides nearly touch. Putting this flattened end into the mouth and blowing causes the two sides to briefly close against each other then spring back, hundreds of times a second. This causes a regular stream of ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
1018 Words Read More

A musical ensemble is a group of two or more musicians who have come together to play music. In theory, an ensemble could contain any number of instruments in any combination, but in practice, certain combinations just don’t work very well, either for musical reasons or because of the sheer practicality of getting particular instruments and players ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
5098 Words Read More

Of the woodwind instruments, the oboe has experienced perhaps the most organic development. There is no single, revolutionary moment at which the oboe became a modern instrument, and it retains strong links with the past both in sound and design. Shawm The modern oboe is a direct descendant of the shawm and the hautboy. The shawm was a ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
1984 Words Read More

‘saxhorn’ has largely dropped out of currency, the effects of Sax’s conception have endured. The E flat soprano saxhorn can be heard today in the form of the soprano cornett, the E flat instrument is now the tenor horn, the B flat instrument is the baritone, the B flat bass is the euphonium and the E flat ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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A conically bored baritone instrument, the serpent is supposed to have been invented by Edmé Guillaume in 1590. Like its close relative, the cornett, it is sounded by buzzing the lips into an ivory-, horn- or metal-cup mouthpiece which, in turn, agitates the air column. Its 213-cm (84-in) length is undulating in appearance, giving it ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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The serpent is the bass member of the cornett family and, like the cornett, is made of two carved pieces of wood that are fastened together and then bound in canvas and leather. Sinuously shaped like two Ss, one leading straight into the other, it has a cup mouthpiece on the end of a brass crook, ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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the short signal horn of English foxhunters, the coiled military signalling bugle, and the whole range of trumpets and other orchestral brass. Introduction | Brass Instruments Instruments | Cornett | Brass ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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Bugle Best known in its military guise, the bugle is one of the simplest of brass instruments in terms of construction, but it is very difficult to play. The single tube of metal has no valves to help create different notes, so players have to do all the work by changing their embouchure – a combination of the ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
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The most strikingly original and authoritative voice on cornet since Louis Armstrong, Leon ‘Bix’ Beiderbecke set the example for a generation of aspiring white jazz players during the 1920s. His meteoric rise to fame was followed by a dramatic fall from grace that led to his ultimate death from alcoholism at the age of just 28 in 1931. A Self-Taught Genius ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
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(Cornet, 1936–95) Besides serving as the perfect complement for Ornette Coleman in the saxophonist’s early quartet, cornettist Don Cherry was a pioneer of the now-popular ‘world music’ movement. His musician father brought the family to Los Angeles from Cherry’s birthplace in Oklahoma, where Cherry played in the Jazz Messiahs before meeting Coleman. After leaving the Coleman group and ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
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(Instrumental group, 1900–17) The Eagle Band, originally led by Buddy Bolden, was an extremely popular and influential New Orleans ensemble. Frankie Duson (or Dusen) (1880–1940), a powerful tailgate trombonist, joined the band in 1906 and went on to take over the band when Bolden suffered a mental collapse the following year. Subsequently, Duson employed various Bolden ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
218 Words Read More
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