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The context in which the trumpet was played – solo and in trumpet ensembles – did not alter greatly in the Renaissance. Meanwhile, its compass expanded upwards. Then in the Baroque period, the bell throat became progressively narrower and, like the horn, it was provided by makers with purpose-built extra lengths of tubing. These could be fitted ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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The trumpet is one of the most ancient instruments still played today. Clear depictions of trumpets survive in Egyptian paintings and two trumpets – one of silver, the other of gold and brass – found in the tomb of Tutankhamun date back to at least 1350 BC. There are many examples of Roman and Greek trumpets which, like the ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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At the beginning of the Middle Ages, the trumpet was a straight piece of cylindrical metal tubing, running from a mouthpiece to the wide ending known as a ‘bell’. A medieval instrument rescued from the mud of the River Thames in London in the 1980s was made of sections of metal sheet (brass or copper) which were rolled up ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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life or where there has been a post-medieval folk revival, which is why they are often associated with Scotland. Styles & Forms | Medieval Era | Classical Instruments | Trumpet | Medieval Era | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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The invention of valves meant that brass instruments could now explore the bass register, and soon after 1835 bass tubas started being manufactured in Germany. Essentially a keyed bugle by descent, the bass tuba (confusingly, the name tuba comes from the Latin word for trumpet) has a very wide conical bore and as a result requires a good ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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B-flat, or occasionally in C, the three-valved cornet was invented in 1830 as a variation on the German post horn, and even briefly threatened to drive the trumpet out of the symphonic orchestra (an idea strongly supported by playwright George Bernard Shaw). In the nineteenth century, it emerged in the ranks of the brass bands, but ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
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singing was now becoming very agile and flamboyant, and melodic instruments that could imitate this sort of soloistic writing were therefore favoured. The cornett, a kind of wooden trumpet, was capable of this, as was the violin, which was rapidly replacing the viol as the preferred string instrument, because of its greater volume and expressive ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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to be weak in these lower notes and the chalumeau went on being used alongside it throughout the eighteenth century. Styles & Forms | Late Baroque | Classical Instruments | Trumpet & Horn | Late Baroque | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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The cornet is very similar to the trumpet in looks and playing technique. It is thought to have been invented by the instrument maker Jean-Louis Antoine in the 1820s. Antoine, who worked for the Parisian firm Halary, was one of a number of makers experimenting with the new valve technology that was revolutionizing brass instruments at the time. His ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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Not to be confused with the modern valved brass-band cornet, which is a kind of small trumpet, the cornett (with that extra final ‘t’) was made of two carved, lightly curved pieces of European hardwood (such as pear) bound together and wrapped in leather. The instrument is further unusual in that it has an octagonal finish. To the ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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to hold their own in terms of volume. It is no accident that the more successful solo jazz instruments have proved to be more strident ones like the saxophone and trumpet rather than the oboe or recorder. An ensemble also needs a supply of quality music that exploits its particular strengths and that ‘sells’ that particular combination of instruments to audiences ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
5098 Words Read More

contributes to problems in intonation that can only be overcome by the player’s skill. Its mouthpiece is cup-shaped but much deeper than that of the cornet or trumpet. Like the trumpet and cornet, the flugelhorn is pitched in Bb. It extends down to an e and can reach bb''. The flugelhorn does not have the same capacity for playing in ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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The nineteenth century saw several attempts at remaking the French horn when a valved horn along the lines of the trumpet competed with an omnitonic horn. The latter looks like a bowl of spaghetti and includes enough tubing for the instrument to be played in any key. The problem was controlling the tubing: models with various kinds of valving were tried. ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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– one by Starck from 1667 and one by Crétien from 1680. They clearly show the key characteristics of the modern horn: the circular spiral coil and conical bore (the trumpet at this time was cylindrically bored). French makers were vital in the development of the horn, and its ‘French horn’ title is an accurate reflection of the instrument’s origins. ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
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Of the woodwind instruments, the oboe has experienced perhaps the most organic development. There is no single, revolutionary moment at which the oboe became a modern instrument, and it retains strong links with the past both in sound and design. Shawm The modern oboe is a direct descendant of the shawm and the hautboy. The shawm was a ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
1984 Words Read More
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