SEARCH RESULTS FOR: tuba
1 of 2 Pages     Next ›

that brass instruments could now explore the bass register, and soon after 1835 bass tubas started being manufactured in Germany. Essentially a keyed bugle by descent, the bass tuba (confusingly, the name tuba comes from the Latin word for trumpet) has a very wide conical bore and as a result requires a good deal of puff. Although the ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
152 Words Read More

The tuba is essentially a large, valved bugle, designed to take the bass part in an orchestra or band. Like the trumpet, it is sounded by buzzing the lips into a mouthpiece. It is conically bored, like the horn, and consequently has a smooth, velvety sound. History The tuba is a youngster among brass instruments; ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
1059 Words Read More

A brass instrument with the tubing curled in an elliptical loop ending in a small bell and fingered using four valves, this is a type of tuba probably based on the saxhorn. When writing the Ring, Wagner wanted a brass instrument to bridge the gap between the French horns and the trombones. The 1853 sketch for Das Rheingold specifies ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
235 Words Read More

, asked Philadelphia instrument makers J.W. Pepper to modify an instrument called the helicon; the company named the final result in his honour. The helicon was a circular bass tuba created in Vienna in the 1840s; the sousaphone added a detachable bell pointing straight up on early versions, and later in a forward direction. In fact there is no ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
1569 Words Read More

instruments were also invented, many of which have stayed in brass bands and wind bands ever since. The cornet, the euphonium and saxhorn families, the flugelhorn and tuba all emerged in the 1830s and 1840s, and mass production enabled brass and wind instruments to be produced at a cost that ordinary people could afford. This resulted in ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
5434 Words Read More

hall, but it can be heard in Vaughan Williams’s London Symphony and Constant Lambert’s (1905–51) Rio Grande (1927). Styles & Forms | Late Romantic | Classical Instruments | Bass Tuba | Late Romantic | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
186 Words Read More

number of available tone colours. The main difference from the chamber orchestra is its use of a full brass section of three trumpets, four horns, three trombones and tuba, which was possible after valved brass instruments became commonly available in the 1840s. To match the extra volume this created, there also tend to be more string players ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
5098 Words Read More

, the rotary valve is operated by a lever and the internal mechanism swivels, not unlike a stopcock. Styles & Forms | Late Romantic | Classical Instruments | Wagner Tuba | Late Romantic | Classical ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
128 Words Read More

the Eb baryton is the modern baritone, the Bb bass is the euphonium and below that are the Eb and Bb contrebasse saxhorns. Introduction | Brass Instruments Instruments | Tuba | Brass ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
502 Words Read More

, with a shared playing technique and a shared quality of sound. After early experiments with a shape modelled on the trumpet, he built the entire family on the tuba model. Although the expression ‘saxhorn’ has largely dropped out of currency, the effects of Sax’s conception have endured. The E flat soprano saxhorn can be heard today in the ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
143 Words Read More

eb'. Like the baritone saxophone, the bass is more commonly heard playing melodies than bass lines – in most wind and big bands the bass is taken by the tuba or double bass. Although popular at the beginning of the jazz era, the bass saxophone was rarely used after the 1930s until a revival of interest from the 1990s ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
2039 Words Read More

bore and a series of finger holes. At the beginning of the nineteenth century three or sometimes more keys were added to it. The serpent was eventually displaced when the tuba was invented. Although often thought of as a Baroque oddity, the serpent had a long life as an instrument in church choirs of the kind Thomas Hardy writes about ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
156 Words Read More

The sousaphone was made to the specifications of the American bandmaster John Philip Sousa (1854–1932). A type of tuba, it has a dramatically wide bell, although it has been argued that the size of the bell has nothing to do with sound production or tone quality and everything to do with being eye-catching. The instrument encircles the player, ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
154 Words Read More

flute, oboe, trumpet and French horn had all found their places in the ensemble; trombones gained a position in the orchestra at last. The coming of the bass tuba in the 1830s eased out the serpents, which had been introduced to provide some bass reinforcements for the trombonists. Meanwhile, the English horn made a comeback, and ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
662 Words Read More

A trombone is a brass instrument sounded by buzzing the lips into a mouthpiece. It is peculiar amongst brass instruments in using a double ‘U’-shaped slide to alter its pitch. The early history of the trombone is confused, mostly due to a lack of clarity in naming instruments. It is generally accepted that the immediate precursor to the trombone was ...

Source: The Illustrated Complete Musical Instruments Handbook, general editor Lucien Jenkins
1133 Words Read More
1 of 2 Pages     Next ›

AUTHORITATIVE

An extensive music information resource, bringing together the talents and expertise of a wide range of editors and musicologists, including Stanley Sadie, Charles Wilson, Paul Du Noyer, Tony Byworth, Bob Allen, Howard Mandel, Cliff Douse, William Schafer, John Wilson...

CURATED

Classical, Rock, Blues, Jazz, Country and more. Flame Tree has been making encyclopaedias and guides about music for over 20 years. Now Flame Tree Pro brings together a huge canon of carefully curated information on genres, styles, artists and instruments. It's a perfect tool for study, and entertaining too, a great companion to our music books.

Rock, A Life Story

Rock, A Life Story

The ultimate story of a life of rock music, from the 1950s to the present day.

David Bowie

David Bowie

Fantastic new, unofficial biography covers his life, music, art and movies, with a sweep of incredible photographs.