SEARCH RESULTS FOR: Fatboy Slim
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(Producer, b. 1963) Norman Cook, former bassist with The Housemartins, has since operated under a number of guises with huge success. As Fatboy Slim he managed to combine the engine room of dance with great rock sounds – including The Who – to create some of the greatest anthems of the 1990s. You’ve Come A Long Way, ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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In his brief, meteoric career, Guitar Slim (1926–59) electrified the blues in more ways than one. While most bluesmen didn’t alter their style as they moved from acoustic to electric guitar in the Forties and Fifties, Slim developed a uniquely electric style, utilizing a 150-ft (46-m) (some say 350-ft/107-m) cable between his guitar and amplifier and creating ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Guitar Heroes, consultant editor Rusty Cutchin
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(Piano, vocals, 1915–88) John Len Chatman was born in Memphis, Tennessee. Influenced by barrelhouse pianists such as Roosevelt Sykes, Slim forged an early career in Memphis playing in cafes, juke joints and other music venues around the Beale Street area. He moved to Chicago in 1937, where he worked with Big Bill Broonzy. He began ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
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(Guitar, vocals, 1925–59) Eddie Lee Jones was born in Greenwood, Mississippi. He sang in church as a child but had relocated to New Orleans by the age of 17, where he worked with Huey ‘Piano’ Smith in a small group until 1953. His recording debut was on Imperial in 1951, but his most important recordings were ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
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(Piano, vocals, 1906–95) Albert Luandrew was born in Vance, Mississippi. He was self-taught as a pianist and spent the period 1925–39 in Memphis, playing functions and small clubs. He went to Chicago to find work outside music, but instead fell in with the local blues crowd and worked with Tampa Red, Jump Jackson and Muddy ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
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(Harmonica, guitar, vocals, 1924–70) Born James Moore in Lobdell, Louisiana, Harpo developed an upbeat style playing juke joints and parties before signing to Excello Records in 1955, where he was instrumental in defining the label’s ‘swamp-blues’ sound. He had a profound influence on 1960s rockers including Van Morrison, the Kinks and the Rolling Stones ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
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(Guitar, b. 1937) Born Morris Holt in Grenada, Mississippi, Slim began playing on Chicago’s West Side in the mid-1960s. In 1976, when Hound Dog Taylor passed away, Slim took over his Sunday afternoon gig at Theresa’s on the South Side. Slim’s band the Teardrops was featured on the 1970 Alligator anthology series Living Chicago Blues. Throughout ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
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(Vocals, 1904–96) Carter, the son of a Baptist minister, was born in Nova Scotia, Canada, and in his youth worked as a rodeo performer in Canada’s western provinces, as well as singing on radio shows. Recording for RCA Records for 50 years, Carter was central to the popularity of cowboy music in the 1930s ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Country Music, consultant editor Bob Allen
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(Vocals, 1927–2003) David Gordon Kirkpatrick, born near Kempsey, New South Wales, was one of Australia’s most popular country artists from the 1950s until his death. He sold in excess of five million records in his home country with hits such as ‘A Pub With No Beer’ (also a Top 3 success in the UK) and ‘Lights On ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Country Music, consultant editor Bob Allen
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(Vocals, b. 1924) Tampa, Florida-born Otis Dewey Whitman Jr. is best known for his warbling, high-falsetto vocal flourishes on sentimental hits like ‘Indian Love Call’ (1952) and ‘Secret Love’ (1954). Although Whitman enjoyed only limited success in the United States, he achieved considerable fame in Europe, especially the British Isles. During the 1980s, he experienced ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Country Music, consultant editor Bob Allen
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(Vocals, b. 1957) Originally scoring hits as part of the Latin-powered Miami Sound Machine in the late 1980s with husband Emilio, Cuban-born Estefan soon went solo with hugely successful pop albums like Into The Light (1991) and Destiny (1996). Always keeping a foot firmly in the Latin market with Spanish-language albums like Abriendo Puertas (1995), she was ideally placed ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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(Vocals, b. 1970) Born Natalie McIntyre in Ohio, Macy Gray is a modern soul singer whose voice is distinctive and demeanor often startlingly original. In 1998, early hits ‘Why Didn’t You Call Me ?’ and ‘I’ve Committed Murder’ started to cause minor ripples in her home country, but by the following year her star was well in ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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(Vocal/instrumental group, 1983–88) Formed in Hull by Paul Heaton (vocals), Stan Cullimore (guitar, vocals), Ted Key (bass) and Hugh Whitaker (drums), the band were the epitome of unassuming British indie pop. Their up-tempo, melodic songs belied some abrasive, politically charged lyrics on the likes of ‘Sheep’ and their first big hit ‘Happy Hour’, from 1986’s all-conquering debut ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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In the mid-1980s, the Chicago DJ Pierre was fiddling around with a new piece of technology, the Roland TB 303 machine. Tampering with its bass sound produced all sorts of squiggly, complex patterns. Pierre and the DJ/producer Marshall Jefferson gave a 12-minute tape of these doodlings to a local DJ, Ron Hardy, who played it at ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
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The 1990s electronica that came to be known as big beat is recognised by its rhythmic clout and propulsive force. With their freaky FX and mental 303 acid lines set to block rockin’ beats, The Chemical Brothers were the architects of this fusion of hip hop and techno; Norman Cook, a.k.a Fatboy Slim, would later emulate ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
612 Words Read More
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