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‘Pass The Dutchie’, 1982 Based on The Mighty Diamonds’ reggae hit, ‘Pass The Kouchie’, Birmingham-based Musical Youth’s ‘Pass The Dutchie’ was a pro-cannabis hit that reached No. 1 in the UK. One of the fastest-selling singles of the year, they could not capitalize on its success, and had disbanded within two years. A reunion was mooted in 1993 ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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In the second half of the twelfth century, the new cathedral of Notre Dame was the focus of an extraordinary effort by Leonin and others to create a whole new musical liturgy. Thanks to their efforts and to the presence of the increasingly independent University of Paris, whose curriculum was aimed towards ecclesiastical careers, the city became a ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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Most Indian classical music has three main components: a solo melody line, a rhythmic accompaniment and a drone. Vocal music is predominant, although modern Western audiences are more aware of instrumental genres. Improvisation, a key feature of Indian music, is based on the elaborate rules of the ragas and talas, which are the principal formal concepts ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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Cantus firmus technique, in which a pre-existent melody forms the basis of a new composition, lends itself well to musical homage, and it is likely that the selection of cantus firmi was often influenced by the dedicatee or patron. This might mean the choice of a favourite song, or a section of plainchant whose text held some ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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Alternative experimental guitarist Thurston Moore (b. 1958) was born in Coral Gables, Florida. Inspired by New York’s punk and new-wave scene, Moore moved to the city in 1977. While playing in a band called The Coachmen, he met Lee Ranaldo, an art student and member of Glenn Branca’s avant-garde guitar orchestra. Moore assembled a band with bassist ...

Source: Rock Guitar Heroes, consultant editor Rusty Cutchin
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By the eighteenth century many musicians had become accustomed to travelling far from their native cities or countries in search of employment, or in response to invitations from rulers of different states. In the late-Baroque period this type of wandering existence had become a standard feature of musical life in Europe, involving singers, instrumentalists and composers, in ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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From the earliest years of the Baroque era musicians, scientists and assorted intellectuals, mainly from Italy, wrote treatises and manifestos discussing the theories, aesthetics and musical practice of a new style of music. By the early eighteenth century almost every country in Europe was producing writers who aimed to define musical styles and concepts. They attempted to ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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Adele was just three years old when she attended her first live gig with her mother: a Cure concert in London’s Finsbury Park. It was the same year her father, a Welsh plumber, left her mother, practically severing all ties with his daughter in the process. After that first gig, the tot took to the music straight ...

Source: Adele: Songbird, by Alice Hudson
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From the eclectic musical melting pot of ragtime, Gilbert & Sullivan, early jazz, Viennese operetta, blackface minstrel shows and authentic Deep-South blues emerged the Broadway show tune. ‘Show’ and ‘tune’, of course, are the essential indicators of musical style. The music created for Broadway musicals – and, subsequently, for the musical form whatever its ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
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During the nineteenth century, women amateurs of the middle and upper classes continued to be taught music privately, often receiving an extremely thorough musical education from the leading musicians of the day. Professional women musicians, like their eighteenth-century predecessors, often came from musical families and were traditionally taught by their parents. Although many learned the art of ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Vocal/instrumental group, 1981–present) Starting life as avant-garde noise merchants, Thurston Moore (vocals, guitar), Kim Gordon (bass, vocals), Lee Ranaldo (guitar, vocals) and a variety of drummers, including Steve Shelley, have been at the centre of New York’s alternative music scene ever since, influencing indie rock immeasurably. Highlights include the striking art rock of ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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(Yo’-han Sa-bäs’tyan Bakh) 1685–1750 German composer Johann Sebastian Bach was born into a closely knit musical family of which he was rightly proud. His father Johann Ambrosius Bach (1645–95) had an identical twin brother, Johann Christoph (1645–93), who was like a second father to the young Sebastian. Johann was such a common name that almost all boys called Johann were known ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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‘Funkytown’, 1980 Possibly the last bona fide disco hit in the US, Lipps, Inc.’s ‘Funkytown’ was a worldwide hit that reached No. 1 (and went platinum) in America, and also reached No. 2 in the UK. Its sparse production was not dissimilar to Prince’s early work of the time (interestingly, both came from Minneapolis), and was ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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(Vocals, b. 1978) Portuguese/Canadian singer Furtado is a shining exponent of feelgood modern pop. After a musical youth spent with DJs and rappers instead of musicians per se, her debut album from 2000, Whoa, Nelly!, accordingly fused the more palatable ingredients of music of the streets with an upbeat pop approach that garnered success for singles ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
102 Words Read More

Jamaican music has never been that far away from mainstream British music since Millie Small stormed the charts in 1964 with the galloping ska of ‘My Boy Lollipop’, but it was not until the end of that decade that reggae became a bona fide part of pop. Heralded by Desmond Dekker’s incredible success in 1969 with ‘It Mek’ and ‘The Israelites’, ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
656 Words Read More
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