SEARCH RESULTS FOR: Brownie McGhee
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(Guitar, vocals, 1915–96) Walter Brown McGhee was born in Knoxville, Tennessee. He learned to play guitar before his tenth birthday and dropped out of school to play throughout the state in the late 1920s. He met Sonny Terry in 1939 and they joined forces almost immediately. McGhee began recording for OKeh in 1940 and moved to New York. ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
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(Vocals, guitar, b. 1948) McGhee was England’s contribution to the Outlaw movement. Though he grew up in Leicestershire, England, and played in rockabilly legend Gene Vincent’s last band, McGhee was such an ardent fan of progressive country that he travelled to Austin, Texas, in 1978 and befriended artists such as Butch Hancock, Jimmie ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Country Music, consultant editor Bob Allen
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It was Louis Armstrong (or Leadbelly, depending on whom you believe) who came up with the famous final word on the definition of folk music: ‘It’s ALL folk music … I ain’t never heard no horse sing.…’ The quote has been repeated ad nauseam throughout the years, but it has not prevented strenuous debate about the meaning of ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
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(Vocal/instrumental group, 1978–present) The W.C. Handy Award-winning duo patterned itself after Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee. Guitarist John ‘Bowling Green’ Cephas (b. 1930) and ‘Harmonica’ Phil Wiggins (b. 1954) met at a jam session in Washington, DC and began performing together in 1978. They toured the globe on a US State Department tour and recorded throughout the 1980s ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
108 Words Read More

(Piano, vocals, 1910–92) William Thomas Dupree was born in New Orleans. He was raised in the Colored Waifs Home for Boys from infancy. He learned piano at an early age and in the 1920s worked barrelhouses as a soloist, as well as playing with traditional jazz bands. From the early 1930s, he worked as a prizefighter and ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
171 Words Read More

(Vocals, maracas, c. 1912–84) Frank Raul Grillo was born in Florida of Cuban extraction and took the name Machito in 1940 when his brother-in-law, trumpet player Mario Bauzá, reorganized his year-old band the Afro-Cubans. Their arrangements clothed Cuban melodies and rhythms in jazz harmonies and instrumental voicings. They were highly influential in the emergence of Afro-Cuban jazz (sometimes ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
100 Words Read More

(Harmonica, vocals, 1911–86) Saunders Terrell was born in Greensboro, Georgia and taught himself to play the harmonica at the age of eight. He lost the sight in one eye, aged 10, and the second eye at 16. Terry played mostly in North Carolina from the late 1920s. He teamed up with Blind Boy Fuller in 1934 ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
197 Words Read More

While the Mississippi Delta gave birth to guitar-based acoustic blues, in the area known as the Piedmont region – which stretches along the Atlantic seaboard from Virginia to Florida – a wide range of blues styles flourished, from the backwoods sound of the Appalachian foothills of Virginia to the more urbane sound of big cities such as Atlanta. The ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
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Mention of the folk revival is generally applied to the late-1950s and early 1960s, when a new generation of enthusiasts earnestly set about exploring the history of folk music and recreating its passionate, social ideals. There had been other folk revivals throughout history, but they tended to stem from the middle classes in search of a purer identity ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
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The 1940s encompassed a wide range of musical art, reflecting extremes of economic hardship and recovery, global war and rebuilding. Empowered by necessarily full-tilt production, US industry recovered from the Depression, though the cream of its youth was siphoned off to fight on distant fronts, and returned to a strange new world. Great Britain suffered air ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
3224 Words Read More

William John Clifton Haley was born on 6 July 1925 in Highland Park, Detroit, and raised near Chester, Pennsylvania. His parents were both musical, and he got his first proper guitar when he was 13. Even though he was blind in one eye and shy about his disability (he later tried to distract from it with his ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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(Vocal/istrumental group, 1970s–present) Lynyrd Skynyrd were finally recognized as the major influence on country music that they were when the tribute album Lynyrd Frynds was released in 1994. At last artists such as Alabama, Hank Williams Jr., Travis Tritt, Steve Earle, Charlie Daniels and Wynonna Judd acknowledged how much they had borrowed from the Jacksonville, ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Country Music, consultant editor Bob Allen
160 Words Read More

There was a time during the western-swing revival of the 1970s when it looked as if the pioneering legacy of Milton Brown (1903–36) And His Musical Brownies would be entirely subsumed amid the accolades given to the music’s most popular, enduring figure, Bob Wills. Fortunately, that didn’t happen, though Wills continues to reign supreme in the popular ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Country Music, consultant editor Bob Allen
737 Words Read More

The Everlys were born into a country music family; Don on 1 February 1937 in Brownie, Kentucky; Phil in Chicago – where father Ike had moved to play in bands with his brothers – on 19 January 1939. The family moved to Shenandoah, Iowa, to a regular slot on a local radio station, and Ike and Margaret’s ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
803 Words Read More

Though it was often referred to as a musical revolution, bebop was actually a natural evolution of jazz, involving innovative approaches to harmony and rhythm that advanced the music forward to a modern era. Traces of bebop began to emerge during the early 1940s, in orchestras led by Earl Hines and Billy Eckstine. Those adventurous impulses were further ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
1023 Words Read More
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