SEARCH RESULTS FOR: Neil Sedaka
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(Piano, singer-songwriter, b. 1939) New York-born Sedaka started writing songs as a teenager with lyricist Howard Greenfield. They wrote many hits for Sedaka, including 1959’s ‘Oh Carol’, 1961’s ‘Happy Birthday Sweet Sixteen’ and 1962’s US No. 1, ‘Breaking Up Is Hard To Do’. The early 1970s saw a Sedaka renaissance when he made two albums with what ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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Canadian rock legend Neil Young (b. 1945) has become respected as much for his playing as for his composing and vocal work with his occasional partners Crosby, Stills & Nash. Born in Toronto, Canada, Young got a ukulele from his father for Christmas in 1958. In 1960, Young moved to Winnipeg with his mother. A poor student ...

Source: Rock Guitar Heroes, consultant editor Rusty Cutchin
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1606–84, French Pierre Corneille, the renowned playwright, wrote verse dramas on heroic and classical themes that were tailor-made for operatic treatment. Corneille’s list of plays that were turned into libretti is not nearly as long as William Shakespeare’s or Sir Walter Scott’s, but it is impressive enough. Corneille’s verse dramas were still attracting composers in the early ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Guitar, vocals, b. 1945) This highly respected Canadian musician first came to prominence in 1967 as a member of Buffalo Springfield. Young’s solo career began in 1969 with Neil Young. For his next album, Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere (1969), he recruited Danny Whitten (guitar), Billy Talbot (bass) and Ralph Molina (drums), collectively known as Crazy Horse. Shortly ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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One of the greatest achievements any guitar player can attain is an immediately recognizable signature tone and style. And though many guitarists have realized this goal, few have done it as emphatically as Police guitarist Andy Summers (b. 1942). From the chord stabs of ‘Roxanne’ and ‘Don’t Stand So Close To Me’ to the arpeggios of ‘Message In A Bottle’ ...

Source: Rock Guitar Heroes, consultant editor Rusty Cutchin
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(Vocals, 1929–2000) Ohio-born ex-Golden Gloves champion boxer Jalacy Hawkins evolved a stage show in which his props included a coffin and a skull, and although he never actually achieved any hit records, his larger-than-life stage show brought him great popularity. He also co-wrote ‘I Put A Spell On You’, a song which was a UK hit for Nina ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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Until the advent of rock’n’roll, pop singers and songwriters were, for the most part, divided into two separate camps. The singers were typically faced with the daunting task of unearthing new hit material, unless, like Frank Sinatra, they were so esteemed that they had the best songwriters in the business lining up to write for ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
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The term ‘singer-songwriter’ tends to be applied to the kind of introspective, socially conscious artist who – in the wake of the folk-inspired movement that was kick-started by Bob Dylan in the early 1960s before peaking in the next decade – performs in a direct yet reflective manner, emphasizing the song’s message over style or calibre of presentation. This is ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
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The 1950s was the decade when the straitjacket imposed by the recent world war was loosened a little – and rock took full advantage. The Sun studios in Memphis and Chess Records in Chicago were the places to be as the likes of Elvis, Jerry Lee Lewis and Chuck Berry turned the existing generation gap into a chasm. Though he ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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When Jimmie Rodgers and The Carter Family became country music’s first superstars in 1927, their audience was the farmers, miners, wives and other blue-collar workers of the rural South. It was an audience that left school early for a life of hard work in isolated communities. When those men and women gathered at a tavern or schoolroom on ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Country Music, consultant editor Bob Allen
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‘The Triptych’ In constructing an operatic triple-bill, Puccini followed no precedent. He had nursed the idea for some time, to the despair of Giulio Ricordi, who felt it would be a box-office disaster. With the publisher’s death in 1912, Puccini soon felt able to work on the project. His librettist for La rondine, Giuseppe Adami, ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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For over 30 years, guitarist Alex Lifeson has quietly served as the cohesive key to success for progressive rockers Rush – arguably the most enduring and successful hard-rock band of all time. A guitarist always more interested in finding the right chord voicing or textural effect to make a chorus work than in shredding the frets off his axe du ...

Source: Rock Guitar Heroes, consultant editor Rusty Cutchin
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A founding member of the band Pentangle, Bert Jansch (b. 1943) was born in Glasgow. He was heavily influenced by the guitarist Davey Graham and folk singers such as Anne Briggs. He has recorded 25 albums and toured extensively, influencing artists like Jimmy Page, Ian Anderson, Nick Drake and Neil Young. Jansch earned a Lifetime Achievement Award ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Guitar Heroes, consultant editor Rusty Cutchin
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(Vocal/instrumental group, 1995–present) Belligerent Scottish rock trio Biffy Clyro – Simon Neil (vocals and guitar), James Johnston (bass) and his twin brother Ben (drums) – issued breakthrough album Puzzle, which reached No. 2 in the UK, in 2007 after their first three LPs failed to reach the Top 40. Follow-up Only Revolutions (2009) also hit the Top 10 ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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(Instrumental group, 1962–71, 1973–77, 1994–present) Stax Records’ house band, Booker T. And The M.G.s also toured and recorded instrumentals in their own right. More than any other group they defined the sound of 1960s soul with their sparse, funky arrangements on hits for other Stax and Atlantic stars like Wilson Pickett, Sam and ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Rock, general editor Michael Heatley
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An extensive music information resource, bringing together the talents and expertise of a wide range of editors and musicologists, including Stanley Sadie, Charles Wilson, Paul Du Noyer, Tony Byworth, Bob Allen, Howard Mandel, Cliff Douse, William Schafer, John Wilson...

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Classical, Rock, Blues, Jazz, Country and more. Flame Tree has been making encyclopaedias and guides about music for over 20 years. Now Flame Tree Pro brings together a huge canon of carefully curated information on genres, styles, artists and instruments. It's a perfect tool for study, and entertaining too, a great companion to our music books.

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