SEARCH RESULTS FOR: hip hop
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Like so many of black America’s most enduring musical genres, hip hop was born out of invention. When, as the 1970s came to a close, a combination of disco and big record company involvement had diluted funk and soul to the extent that it had become boring to go out to a club on a Saturday night, something rumbled out of New ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
934 Words Read More

Once hip hop had expanded beyond apparently using the hook lines from Chic’s ‘Good Times’ as the basis for just about everything, it quickly became as diverse as any other black music genre. Its evolution in recording studios took it way beyond the scope of conventional instruments. Can’t play piano like Herbie Hancock or bass like Bootsy ? So what ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
625 Words Read More

It is a common enough opinion that the words ‘British’ and ‘rap’ are contradictions in terms. Unfortunately, this is indeed the case and it is solely because of the language barrier: rap delivered in any form of English other than American does not sound authentic. To attempt rap in the Queen’s English became known as the ‘Derek B Syndrome’, after ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
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Rumbling out of Los Angeles with different beats, a different look and a very different attitude, gangsta rap was hip hop’s belligerent street child. This new sound grew up at black discos and parties away from mainstream interference, and so, much as the original hip hop had, it quite literally pleased itself and harked back to ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
983 Words Read More

When The Sugarhill Gang and Kurtis Blow made an impact on the mainstream pop charts in 1979, rap was immediately palmed off as a novelty. However, the style not only survived, but has proved to be so influential that, in varying degrees, pop, rock, heavy metal and reggae have all borrowed from hip hop ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
963 Words Read More

As the 1970s played out and disco took over, a new generation reacted against the commercial homogenization of black music by creating a completely new sound. This sound came from the streets and was accompanied by its own dress code, language, dance styles and attitude: hip hop was a way of life.  Whereas disco was symbolized by ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
978 Words Read More

It used to be easy to talk about rap or hip hop, because essentially everybody knew where they stood: the artists made 12-inch singles that didn’t get played on the radio; they dressed in acres of brightly coloured leather, with people break-dancing and body-popping around them; and nobody came from farther west than New Jersey. Back in the day ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
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It has been argued that all rap is political: a genuine black street statement, giving voice to those outside the musical or social establishments in a way that connects with a similarly dispossessed audience, and so its very existence is a political act. While many will be justified in thinking this is patently nonsense, it is, actually ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
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Jungle and UK garage are often cited as the only real British contributions to electronic music, but the slow motion beats of trip hop are also steeped in the multi-cultural sounds of UK music. Influenced by 1980s dub acts like On-U-Sound, Adrian Sherwood and African Headcharge and their own sound system backgrounds, Bristol based acts like Smith & ...

Source: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music, general editor Paul Du Noyer
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(Fri-drikh Fran’-zhek [Fra-da-rek’ Fran-swa’] Sho-pan) 1810–49 Polish composer Chopin was unique among composers of the highest achievement and influence in that he wrote all his works, with the merest handful of exceptions, for the solo piano. Leaving Warsaw, which at the time offered only restricted musical possibilities, and living most of his adult life in Paris, ...

Source: Classical Music Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
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(Guitar, vocals, 1911–82) Sam Hopkins was born in Centerville, Texas. His father and two brothers were musicians and he learned guitar from an early age. He met and played with Blind Lemon Jefferson at the age of eight. He accompanied his cousin, Texas Alexander, for much of the 1930s, drifting through Texas. He was discovered ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
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(Guitar, vocals, b. 1942) This Tulsa, Oklahoma native’s return to his roots as a blues player has been characterized by barnstorming live sets and albums for the Alligator label in the Chicago electric tradition, at times approximating the sound of Elmore James’s bands. Bishop, who became a charter member of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band while ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
114 Words Read More

(Piano, b. 1960) A prolific recording artist, Shipp considers himself to be a follower of bassist William Parker, with whom he has worked on many projects including the David S. Ware’s Quartet. His keyboard style is rhythmically propulsive; he lays dense harmonic accompaniments for single-note instruments. In 1999 he contracted with Thirsty Ear Records to produce his own ...

Source: The Definitive Illustrated Encyclopedia of Jazz & Blues, founding editor Howard Mandel
93 Words Read More

Rameau’s magnificent Hippolyte et Aricie is a rare example of a major composer’s first attempt at opera also being one of his greatest achievements. However, Rameau was nearly 50 years old and already a respected and experienced musician when he composed it, and had evidently been contemplating the project for several years. The impressive literary quality of Pellegrin’s libretto ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
683 Words Read More

Opera censorship was a fact of life for nineteenth-century composers and librettists. Libretti were minutely picked over for anything that might give offence, encourage sedition or create public disorder. Censors even attended dress rehearsals to make sure there was no ‘improper’ scenery, costumes or stage business. The Spaniards, Austrians and French who occupied Italy at various times suspected ...

Source: Definitive Opera Encyclopedia, founding editor Stanley Sadie
212 Words Read More
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